Capitols & Churches

Capitols & churches: Dexter’s goat hill to the steps of history

Capitols & churches: Dexter’s goat hill to the steps of history

Capitols & Churches June 27, 2015 at 4:08 pm 0 comments

By Gary Flannagan If the goats that roamed Andrew Dexter’s pasture in 1845 only knew the events that would follow. Mr. Dexter saw the future and kept his land ready for the new state capital being moved from Tuscaloosa to Montgomery. Built in 1847, burned in 1849 and rebuilt inRead More

Capitols & churches: Florida’s old, new, tall, and short optical illusion

Capitols & churches: Florida’s old, new, tall, and short optical illusion

Capitols & Churches June 27, 2015 at 3:42 pm 0 comments

By Gary Flanagan Tallahassee at first glance is a curious place to be the capital of Florida. It is closer to the state borders of Georgia and Alabama than the six largest cities in its home state. It lies in a rural unpopulated area of the panhandle. When one approachesRead More

Capitols & churches: Louisiana purchased the spiritual heart of Baton Rouge

Capitols & churches: Louisiana purchased the spiritual heart of Baton Rouge

Capitols & Churches June 27, 2015 at 1:51 pm 0 comments

By Gary Flanagan St. Joseph’s Cathedral has stood in the center of Baton Rouge since 1853. The founding parish was established by King Carlos IV of Spain in 1792. Father Carlos Burke, born in Ireland, but schooled in France and Spain was the first pastor.In 1803, The Louisiana Purchase broughtRead More

Capitol & churches: moving King George’s capitol

Capitol & churches: moving King George’s capitol

Capitols & Churches February 1, 2015 at 9:11 pm 0 comments

By Gary Flanagan Leaving Columbia, South Carolina we head West on Interstate 20 into the state named for King George II. Clearly our early founders had a difficult time running from and staying true to the crown of England. Before we arrive in the current state capital of Georgia, Atlanta,Read More

Capitols & churches: the Church of South Carolina

Capitols & churches: the Church of South Carolina

Capitols & Churches January 17, 2015 at 4:18 pm 0 comments

By Gary Flanagan As one of the original 13 colonies, South Carolina owes much of its early history to the crown of England. In 1663, the first owners began to establish roots in Charleston as it became the first capital. The Church of England was established as the first officialRead More

Capitols & churches: a state temple and churches on grace

Capitols & churches: a state temple and churches on grace

Capitols & Churches December 12, 2014 at 12:58 pm 0 comments

By Gary Flanagan There are two choices when leaving Washington, D.C.: north to Maryland or south to Virginia. Travelling salespersons and separation researchers are not efficient in a March snowstorm, so south we go. The first detour is the Jefferson Memorial (and yes, Thomas Jefferson is going to be aRead More

In the shadow of our nation’s Capitol

In the shadow of our nation’s Capitol

Capitols & Churches December 2, 2014 at 3:32 pm 0 comments

By Gary Flanagan Washington, District of Columbia. The U.S. Capitol was completed in 1800 and at first separation of church and state was nonexistent. Religious services were held within its halls every Sunday and attended by presidents starting with Thomas Jefferson. This continued well into the middle of the centuryRead More

A hedge in U.S. history

A hedge in U.S. history

Capitols & Churches November 28, 2014 at 1:05 pm 0 comments

  By Gary Flanagan Roger me this, Thomas me that. A 95-word sentence in the 1600s; an 83-word sentence at the beginning of the 1800s, both written in response to another letter. Now they are both reduced to a five-word metaphor, “separation of church and state.” These letters are whereRead More

A metaphoric journey to the land between church and state

Capitols & Churches November 21, 2014 at 9:57 am 0 comments

By Gary Flanagan The separation of church and state. Has there ever been a metaphor so misunderstood? There must be five requirements for a metaphor to be effective: simplicity, concreteness, visual appeal, creativeness and concision. Is it true to the Greek origin of “metaphor,” namely to transfer word meaning fromRead More