Southern style: A sweeping success

tsj column writers - southern styleBy Randall Franks

Performing on the road has its great moments and even a few that are less great. Needless to say there are often things to laugh at along the way.

One of my devoted readers said that I have been too serious of late and needed to spread some cheer. So here is one of my favorite experiences along the way. Maybe it will bring a smile.

I was introduced to a large hall of about 1,000 folks gathered to see our show. We were in the midst of singing “Little Girl of Mine in Tennessee” when a older feller about six foot tall in tattered blue coveralls and carrying a broom sweeps his way across the stage in front of the band, facing the band, all the time paying no mind to the crowd behind him or the band in front of him.

His slightly slumped appearance, along with his total disregard for his surroundings and his intense concentration on his task, began to draw some scattered giggles from the audience.

I imagined many were wondering what I or he would do next.

As I realized he was not just passing through but had decided to set up housekeeping in front of us, I stopped the tune and said, “Excuse me, were trying to do a show here,” and the feller replied “A show?”

He turned slowly towards the audience and waved as he smiled from ear to ear, saying “Hello, hello,” not hardly missing anyone as he greeted the crowd.

“Do you mind, these people paid a lot of money to see our show,” I said.

 He walked over to me at the mike and looked out in the audience.

“These people paid money to see you?” he asked.

“Yes, they did,” I said.

“Miracles never cease,” he said.

“Yeah,” I said, before realizing what had passed. “Heyyyy.”

“I use to play in a band, a big band. We worked all over New York, Chicago,” he said.

“Really what did you call your band?” I asked.

“The broom boys,” he replied.

“The broom boys,” I said

“Yeah, we really cleaned up,” he said.

“Did you sing with that group?” I asked. He said, “Yes.”

“Would you like to sing with us?” I asked.

“I don’t know. I’ve got so every time I sing I cry,” he said.

“Then why do you sing?” I asked.

“So I can cry,” he said.

“Why do you cry?” I asked.

“Cause I can’t sing,” he said.

“Do you think I could join your band?” he asked.

“Well I don’t know. All these boys had to go through an interview,” I said.

“I can do that,” he said.

I agreed and started by asking, “What’s your name?”

“I was named after my Ma and Pa,” he said.

“Alright, what was their name?” I said.

“Pa was Ferdinand and Ma was Liza,” he said.

“So, what did they name you?” I asked.

“Ferdiliza,” he said.

“Where were you born?” I asked.

“Kentucky,” he replied.

“What part?” I asked.

“All of me. You didn’t think I came in pieces did you?” he said.

“Why did you leave Kentucky?” I asked.

“Couldn’t bring it with me,” he said.

“Where do you live now?” I asked.

“I live with a friend,” he said.

“Where does you friend live,” I asked.

“He lives with me,” he said.

“Where do you both live?” I asked.

“We live together,” he said.

“Where were your forefathers born?” I asked.

“My what?” he asked.

“Your forefathers. Where were they born?” I asked.

“I ain’t got but one father,” he said.

“Everybody has forefathers,” I said. “Mine came from Scotland, Germany and England.”

 “Well if I got four fathers, three of them ain’t never been home,” he said.

“So do I get the job?” he asked.

“Well, I don’t know let me think on it,” I told him.

“OK, but don’t hurt yourself,” he replied.

“Hey, that’s no way to talk to someone if you want a job,” I said.

“You’re right, I better get back to work,” he said.

 I stopped him and asked one more question.

“When you say things like that, doesn’t a still small voice tell you you’re doing something wrong?”

“No, its usually a big loud voice. Have you met my wife?” he said.

“In the future I hope you are more careful about where you try to clean up,” I told him.

“Oh, I will be next time. I’ll bring a bigger broom,” he commented as he glided off stage.

Comedy has always been a key part of performing in live shows: the antics of clowns in circuses; the banter and quips of comics in medicine shows and vaudeville; to the jokes we hear offered in sitcoms today. Country comedians are a special breed; I am honored to in my life played both the comedian and the straight man roles of the comedy team with many funny people. There is nothing funnier than two people working off each other’s comedic timing in front of an audience. I put together this comedy routine originally for the talented comedic actor Sonny Shroyer. I hope that a couple of the lines brought you a smile. © 1992 Peach Picked Publishing. Used by permission.

(Randall Franks is an award-winning musician, singer and actor. He is best known for his role as Officer Randy Goode on “In the Heat of the Night” now on WGN America. His latest CD, “Mississippi Moon,” is by Crimson Records. He is a member of the Independent Country Music Hall of Fame. His latest book is “Encouragers II: Walking with the Masters.” He is a syndicated columnist for http://randallfranks.com/ and can be reached at rfrankscatoosa@gmail.com.)

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