Al Sharpton, Comcast and Time Warner face discrimination lawsuit

Al_Sharpton_January_2015  2SAN FRANCISCO (press release)—Regular White House visitor Al Sharpton and cable giants Comcast and Time Warner are being sued by the National Association of African-American Owned Media (NAAAOM) for discrimination it was reported Wednesday. Sharpton is already in trouble with the IRS for back taxes totaling over $5 million.

Comcast and Time Warner had recently announced a merger. NAAAOM charges in its complaint that the companies effectively bought protection from Sharpton and other black advocacy groups against possible claims of racial discrimination, according to The Hollywood Reporter. The charges are nothing new for Sharpton who has been accused of taking payoffs in the past.

NAAAOM has already sued AT&T and DirecTV for discrimination. They described their complaint as “the economic inclusion of truly 100 percent African-American owned media,” according to a press release.

The racial discrimination lawsuit was filed in California. It asks for $20 billion in reparations. The suit alleges that despite billions of dollars in investments, The Africa Channel is the only TV channel carried by the companies that is actually owned by blacks.

The organization also charges that Sharpton’s National Action Network received donations of some $3.8 million from the cable companies. That, in effect saw the companies paying Sharpton, the suit claims, to say that “Comcast business dealings met standards of diversity.”

Furthermore, NAAAOM filing charges that despite notoriously low ratings, Al Sharpton kept his MSNBC program on the air as a result of continued public support for Comcast on issues of diversity, according to the Reporter.

The National Action Network said, “As for Rev. Sharpton’s TV show ratings the numbers are clear. Rev. Sharpton’s show has the highest ratings of any 6 p.m. show in the history of the network.” Being that it is on low-rated MSNBC, the pronouncement is dubious. The lawsuit is pending.

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