Did you ever wonder if 1+1 really is 2?

Randall Franks imageBy Randall Franks

I often wonder what happened to math in America. I know I had my own trouble with it when I was in school. They always wanted you to follow some method of reaching the answer and show how you reached the answer. Even if you got the right answer, if you didn’t go at it the right way you were wrong.

I realize that we were taught these approaches to aid us in developing a sense of reasoning and help us learn to solve problems.

I greatly admire those underpaid, under supported patriots of education, our teachers. I know many of them took their time to help me through some tough subjects. I have seen first hand teachers going above and beyond to help out a student. So please do not take what I am about to talk about as a commentary on the ability of teachers.

I went into a grocery store chain with a card. They scan it before ringing up your purchases. If you watch those prices closely as they scan items, this store is frustrating because the register shows the full price and then shows the deduction for their store savings.

After watching all the prices, the tally overcharged me around one dollar and twelve cents. I then proceeded to customer service where I shared with them my problem.

I had bought six or twelve of one item that was on discount and one other item. Adding the cost up in my head, I told the clerk what it was suppose to be plus whatever the tax was in that county. This figure subtracted from what I paid the cashier would have been the amount of my refund. My next twenty minutes involved two clerks and an assistant manager or a store manager, all took the figures I had given them from my head and repeatedly added them up on their calculator. In the end they gave me a refund of over two dollars.

Despite of my attempts to convince them they didn’t owe me that much, I could not convince them. I even took a piece of paper, wrote the numbers down and added them for them. I finally took the refund and went on my way. I figure that twenty minutes must be worth that extra little bit.

Unfortunately, what I have just described is a sad trend all across our country. Folks just don’t seem to be able to do basic everyday math problems without the aid of a calculator or cash register. How many times have you walked into a store to buy something, handed the cashier a dollar, and they had difficulty figuring out your change.

My granddad Bill was a farmer most of his life. He went west and was a cowboy in the late 1800’s. If he went to school, it was the school of life. When it came to the math he needed to raise cattle and hogs, grow and sell crops and buy and sell land. In his head he could figure better than most accountants could with a calculator.

My parents made sure I could add, subtract, multiply and divide before they even sent me off to first grade. Those are tools I carry with me. These basics at times were a disadvantage in those previously mentioned math problems, which required a certain method to be followed. But all in all I owe my parents and teachers a great debt of giving me the basics.

Maybe folks just depend too much upon calculators that are now part of the computers we carry around in our pockets. It is easier. I use them myself but usually just to double check my own solution. In recent years, I have found myself doubting my own answers derived from figuring in my head. Not that I’ve been wrong that much but the calculator is so much easier. And it’s never wrong. Just look how well it worked at that grocery store. If I could just find another 999,999 clerks using calculators like that, I could retire.

(Randall Franks is an award-winning musician, singer and actor. He is best known for his role as “Officer Randy Goode” on TV’s “In the Heat of the Night” now on WGN America. His latest CD release, “Mississippi Moon,” is by Crimson Records. He is a member of the Independent Country Music Hall of Fame. His latest book is “Encouragers I: Finding the Light.” He is a syndicated columnist for http://randallfranks.com/ and can be reached at rfrankscatoosa@gmail.com.)

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